Blog | Center for Civil Rights

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project Report Examines School Segregation and Educational Equity in Duplin County

In its new Inclusion Project report, the UNC Center for Civil Rights examines direct community-based, education advocacy in Duplin County. The Inclusion Project seeks to provide communities, advocates, funders, and policy makers with an understanding of the challenges facing excluded communities. The project began in 2013 with the release of “The State of Exclusion” report, and includes a series of county profiles analyzing the continuing impacts of the legacy of racial segregation.
The UNC Center for Civil Rights’ newest county profile highlights repeated and continuing decisions by Duplin County Schools (DCS) regarding school locations, feeder patterns, grade alignments, and attendance area boundaries that have foreseeably produced racially isolated schools, reflecting historic and deeply entrenched patterns of residential racial segregation. This report is the first installment of a three-part series on education, environmental justice and civic engagement in Duplin County. In the series, CCR aims to present the data along with an historical perspective to show how the struggles for education equity, environmental justice, and equal access to political representation overlap and inform each other.

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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Wed. August 16, 2017 4:16 PM
Categories: Education, Race Discrimination, Segregation

Community Civic Engagement Training in Duplin County

Center fellow and interns address REACH members
Center fellow and interns address REACH members
REACH members learn about ways to engage with local government
REACH members learn about ways to engage with local government

At the request of the Rural Empowerment Association for Community HELP (REACH), Center for Civil Rights summer interns Daniel Kale, 2nd year UNC Law student, and UNC undergraduate Kendall Cox, with the Center’s new Attorney-Fellow, Allen Buansi, gave a comprehensive overview of opportunities for residents in Duplin County to actively engage with their local government. REACH, made up of members of the local community who regularly gather to address issues of health and environment, invited the Center to present information and answer questions about voting and electoral requirements, election results (including voter turnout) in the most recent local government elections in Duplin County, and advisory boards and commissions appointed by elected officials. Two members of the Duplin County Board of Commissioners attended in this Community Civic Engagement Training, and expressed thanks to the Center for bringing much-needed technical support and information to their constituents.


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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Tue. July 18, 2017 3:13 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, General, Law Students, Next Generation Series

Rogers Road Remediation: A Promise Finally Fulfilled

Rev. Campbell speaks to a packed RENA Community Center at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
Rev. Robert Campbell speaks to a packed RENA Community Center at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
David Caldwell addresses the crowd at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
Mr. David Caldwell addresses the crowd at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
After a 45-year-long struggle, the Rogers-Eubanks community saw the promise of environmental justice at last fulfilled. On June 21, the Rogers Eubanks Neighborhood Association (RENA) Community Center hosted the groundbreaking ceremony for the construction of sewer infrastructure in Rogers-Eubanks, a 155-year-old, majority African American community in Orange County, NC.
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Posted by Allen K. Buansi on Fri. June 23, 2017 10:37 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Pitt County, Race Discrimination

NC Court of Appeals Rules Against Eugenics Claimants' Constitutional Claims

N.C.G.S. § 143B-426.52
N.C.G.S. § 143B-426.52

In a disappointing decision on June 6, the North Carolina Court of Appeals rejected the constitutional challenge brought by the heirs of three victims of the state’s eugenics program. In 2015, the Industrial Commission had denied their claims under the Eugenics Compensation Act because the victims had died before June 30, 2013.


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Posted by Allen K. Buansi on Thu. June 8, 2017 4:12 PM
Categories: Sterilization

New Op-ed: "Cary Town Council Should Back Habitat Housing"

This op-ed by CCR Managing Attorney Mark Dorosin and Senior Staff Attorney Elizabeth Haddix appeared in the News & Observer on May 19.  The commentary describes the impacts of residential segregation and the goals of the Fair Housing Act, and follows a May 9 story about the Town of Cary Planning Board's rejection of a rezoning request by Habitat for Humanity that would have allowed the nonprofit to build 9 affordable homes.
Your Rights to Fair Housing


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Posted by Mark Dorosin on Wed. May 24, 2017 10:02 AM
Categories: Fair Housing, Wake County

Center receives Stella J. Adams Fair Housing Advocate Award

Lewis Dozier, the president of the Royal Oaks Concerned Citizens Association and the Center for Civil Rights, each awarded the Stella J. Adams Award.
Lewis Dozier, the president of the Royal Oaks Concerned Citizens Association and the Center for Civil Rights, each awarded the Stella J. Adams Award.

On April 28th, the Center’s staff attended the 14th annual Fair Housing Conference organized by the City of Raleigh, the Raleigh Fair Housing Hearing Board, and the Fair Housing Project of Legal Aid of North Carolina. Distinguished advocates discussed the rights and remedies available under the Fair Housing Act for victims of illegal discrimination, as well as reforms needed in the criminal background screening process for housing applicants. The Center’s Executive Director Ted Shaw gave a rousing keynote address. At the end of the conference, the Royal Oak Concerned Citizens Association and the UNC Center for Civil Rights were awarded the 2017 Stella J. Adams Fair Housing Advocate Award in recognition of their environmental justice advocacy on behalf of residents of Royal Oak, an African American community in Brunswick County. Read more about that advocacy here.


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Posted by Allen K. Buansi on Mon. May 1, 2017 2:06 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing

Center Co-chairs "Representing Arab and Muslim-Americans in the Trump Era" CLE

The Agenda from the "Representing Arab and Muslim-Americans in the Trump Era" CLE
The Agenda from the "Representing Arab and Muslim-Americans in the Trump Era" CLE

On April 11, the UNC Center for Civil Rights facilitated a seminar for lawyers on how to best represent Arab and Muslim-Americans under the current administration. Speakers included Christopher Brook of the ACLU of North Carolina, Bradley Banis of Barnwell, Whaley Patterson & Helms, Joseph Zeszotarski Jr. of Gammon, Howard & Zeszotarski, Manzoor Cheema of Project South and Catherine Kim of the University of North Carolina School of Law. Topics ranged from challenging naturalization and green card delays to counseling clients facing questioning by law enforcement to the Muslim immigrant bans. The Center was proud to cosponsor the CLE with the North Carolina chapter of the National Lawyers Guild and Project South.


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Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Mon. April 17, 2017 4:19 PM
Categories: General, Professional Development

Recap: "Justice for All" Benefit Concert at the Haw River Ballroom

Naeema Muhammad, co-director of the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network.
Naeema Muhammad, co-director of the North Carolina Environmental Justice Network, speaks about her experience working alongside the UNC Center for Civil Rights.

On Sunday, April 9th, the UNC Center for Civil Rights gathered with friends and colleagues for "Justice for All," a benefit concert hosted at the Haw River Ballroom in Saxapahaw, NC.  Non-profit community outreach network Mighty Neighborly organized the concert in response to the UNC Board of Governors' ongoing effort to prohibit the Center for Civil Rights from engaging in any direct representation or advocacy on behalf of individuals, families or communities. 

Justice for All performers included Keny Roby, I Was Totally Destroying It, shirlette ammons, The Backsliders, Elizabeth Haddix and the Gurley Flynns, Pre-Raphaelites, Happy Abandon, Laurelyn Dossett, Molly McGinn, and Alice Gerrard.

Between musical performances, a number of speakers shared their support for the Center for Civil Rights.  Speakers included Senator Floyd McKissick, Senator Angela Bryant, Representative Graig Meyer, Professor Gene Nichol, North Carolina Environmental Justice Network co-director Naeema Muhammad, and the Center's managing attorney, Mark Dorosin.

Center staff thank the concert's performers, speakers, and organizers, as well as all who attended, for their support.  Photos from the event are below.


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Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Wed. April 12, 2017 10:24 AM
Categories: General, Law Students

Center Receives UNC Diversity Award

The UNC Center for Civil Rights was among those honored at the University Diversity Awards on Tuesday, April 4th. UNC Law Professor and Librarian Donna Nixon presented the Center with the University’s 2017 Diversity Award for Department or Unit. Director Ted Shaw, accompanied by the Center staff, accepted the award and spoke on the importance of continuing civil rights advocacy even as we recognize the 49th anniversary of the assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Wed. April 5, 2017 4:43 PM
Categories: General

CLARIFYING THE RECORD

To support the Board of Governors effort to prohibit the Center for Civil Rights from engaging in any direct representation or advocacy on behalf of individuals, families or communities, one BOG member circulated a memo to that mischaracterized the Center's work and mission. The following is to provide some context and clarification of that memo. 

Claim: The Center for Civil Rights has no oversight to ensure that it pursues UNC’s educational mission rather than the “personal causes and interests of center personnel.”
Fact:The Executive Director of the Center is a tenured member of the law school faculty and oversees the work of the Center, including its direct representation and advocacy. Additionally, before any litigation can commence, Center staff must submit a justification memo to the Dean of the Law School. The Center cannot engage in litigation without the Dean’s approval.

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Posted by Mark Dorosin on Thu. March 23, 2017 3:13 PM
Categories: General, Law Students
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