Blog Posts: Amicus Curiae

4th Circuit Strikes Down North Carolina's Voter ID Law

Today the U.S Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit reversed decisions of the North Carolina Federal District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina in consolidated cases challenging sweeping restrictions on voting rights enacted by the North Carolina legislature. We are heartened by the Appellate Court’s decision today, which, taken with a similar decision by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals which covers Mississippi, Louisiana, and Texas, constitutes a significant turn against racial discrimination in electoral politics.
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Posted by Theodore M. Shaw (Ted) on Fri. July 29, 2016 2:43 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Race Discrimination, Voting Rights

Center for Civil Rights and Youth Justice Clinic File Amicus Brief in Fourth Circuit Case Challenging North Carolina Parole System Treatment of Juvenile Offenders

On February 16, the UNC Center for Civil Rights and the UNC Youth Justice Clinic filed an amicus brief to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in Hayden v. Butler.  The amicus brief supports Plaintiff-Appellee Shaun Hayden, a North Carolina prisoner challenging the constitutionality of the State’s parole system as it applies to juvenile offenders.  Hayden, who is represented by North Carolina Prisoner Legal Services, was sentenced to life with the possibility of parole for crimes he committed when he was 15.


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Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Thu. February 18, 2016 2:42 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Criminal Justice

NC Supreme Court Finds Segregating School Voucher Program Constitutional

By a 4-3 vote North Carolina’s Supreme Court overturned the ruling that the education voucher program, which sends public taxpayer dollars to private schools, is unconstitutional. In North Carolina, taxpayer support will now flow freely to schools that are not required to have trained or certified teachers, any identified or minimum curriculum, any accreditation, criminal background checks for employees, and that can discriminate on the basis of religion. Center submitted an amicus curiae brief arguing the program was unconstitutional because it increases segregation in public schools.


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Posted by Elizabeth M. Haddix on Mon. July 27, 2015 2:06 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Segregation

Center Files Amicus Briefs in NC School Voucher Case

The UNC Center for Civil Rights (the Center) represents the North Carolina NAACP as amicus to the NC Supreme Court on State defendants’ appeal of a 2014 order finding NC’s voucher program unconstitutional. Over 70 school districts, as well as the NC School Boards Association, filed suit in 2013 to challenge the program, while taxpayers and parents filed a separate action. Oral argument at NC’s highest court took place on February 24, 2015, and a decision is pending. Read the 2014 (PDF) and 2015 (PDF) amicus briefs.


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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Fri. March 6, 2015 3:25 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Segregation

Center for Civil Rights Files Amicus Brief in School Voucher Case

UPDATE: On Friday February 21, Judge Robert Hobgood granted the Plaintiffs' motion for preliminary injunction and stopping the implementation of the voucher program. No voucher payments will be made in 2014-15. The State and the pro-voucher Institute of Justice, which intervened in the case, is expected to appeal the ruling. The Center looks forward to continuing to represent the NC NAACP in defending this landmark victory.


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Posted by Mark Dorosin on Tue. February 25, 2014 10:30 AM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Race Discrimination

UNC Center for Civil Rights Joins Amicus Curiae Brief to Defend Narrowly Tailored use of Race in College Admissions

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, along with the UNC Center for Civil Rights and thirty other national civil rights organizations filed an amicus curiae brief in the U.S. Supreme Court in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. The case involves a challenge to a 2006 statewide referendum in Michigan that sought to amend the state constitution to prevent the Michigan colleges from any consideration of race in college admissions, eliminating the narrowly tailored race conscious admissions upheld by the Supreme Court in Grutter v. Bollinger and recently reaffirmed in Fisher v. University of Texas. The Center submitted briefs on behalf of UNC Law School in Grutter and of UNC-Chapel Hill in Fisher.


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No Comments | Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Tue. September 24, 2013 3:38 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Race Discrimination

Center's Leandro III Brief Asks State to Remedy Constitutional Violations

The UNC Center for Civil Rights filed its brief with the North Carolina Supreme Court in opposition to the State’s most recent appeal in the ongoing Leandro education litigation. The case, which began almost 20 years ago, affirmed the State’s constitutional obligation to provide a sound basic education to North Carolina children. In 2005, the Center intervened in the ongoing case on behalf of parents and children in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school system and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Branch of the NAACP, with the support of the North Carolina State Conference and the national NAACP.


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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Tue. September 3, 2013 12:31 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Charlotte-Mecklenburg, Education, Leandro, Race Discrimination

CCR Staff, UNC Law Professors perform Fisher vs. TX arguments

In a recent "Race and the Law" series, Center staff and UNC Law School professors reenacted excerpts from the oral arguments in the Fisher v. University of Texas. The case was heard at the US Supreme Court on October 10, 2012. UNC School of Law Dean Jack Boger. CCR Attorneys Mark Dorosin and Elizabeth Haddix, and the UNC Office of University Counsel filed an an amicus brief on behalf of the University of North Carolina in this case.

Center Deputy Director Charles Daye played the role of Chief Justice Roberts. Center attorneys Mark Dorosin and Elizabeth Haddix and UNC Law professors Eric Muller, Erika Wilson, Al Brophy, and Catherine Kim played other Justices. Community Inclusion Fellow Bethan Eynon read the position of Petitioner Fisher, Education Fellow Taiyyaba Qureshi took the part of Respondent University of Texas, and Equal Justice Works Fellow Peter Gilbert acted as US Solicitor General.

Watch the video below:


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Posted by Taiyyaba A. Qureshi on Mon. January 14, 2013 12:01 AM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Race and the Law Series, Race Discrimination

Fisher Amici speak on Constitution Day Panel at UNC Law School

CCR attorneys Mark Dorosin and Elizabeth Haddix, and UNC School of Law Dean Jack Boger, together with the Office of University Counsel filed an amicus curiae brief on behalf of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (“UNC”) in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin. The US Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the case on October 10, and a ruling is expected next spring.

On Constitution Day, September 17, Center attorneys Dorosin and Haddix, Center Deputy Director Charles Daye, and Dean Boger joined Steve Farmer, UNC Vice Provost for Admissions, on a panel at UNC Law School to discuss Fisher v. Texas and the continuing need for race-conscious and diversity-promoting higher education admission policies.  Steve Farmer also wrote an op-ed that was published in The Hill on October 8, entitled Fisher v. Texas: It's wrong to curb diversity.

Watch the video of the panel:

Fisher v. University of Texas, Constitution Day 2012 Discussion from UNC School of Law on Vimeo.


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Posted by Taiyyaba A. Qureshi on Wed. October 17, 2012 2:45 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education, Race and the Law Series

Center for Civil Rights, School of Law, UNC-CH General Counsel file amicus brief supporting racial diversity in college admissions

Dean Boger, center, moderates a panel on Fisher vs. Texas at UNC Law on Constitution Day. From left, Center Managing Attorney Mark Dorosin, Senior Attorney Elizabeth Haddix, Dean Jack Boger, Center Deputy Director Charles Daye, and UNC Vice Provost of Admissions Steve Farmer

CCR staff attorneys Mark Dorosin and Elizabeth Haddix, and UNC School of Law Dean Jack Boger, together with the Office of University Counsel filed an amicus brief on behalf of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (“UNC”) in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin.

The case, now pending before the U.S. Supreme Court, challenges the limited consideration of race in college admissions and seeks to overturn the Court’s well-established precedents, most recently re-affirmed in 2003 in Grutter v. Bollinger, that diversity in higher education is a compelling governmental interest. UNC's amicus brief emphasizes that UNC’s mission is to serve as a center for research, scholarship, and creativity, and to develop the next generation of leaders for our increasingly diverse state.


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Posted by Mark Dorosin on Tue. August 14, 2012 2:24 PM
Categories: Amicus Curiae, Education
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