Blog Posts: Community Inclusion

Community Civic Engagement Training in Duplin County

Center fellow and interns address REACH members
Center fellow and interns address REACH members
REACH members learn about ways to engage with local government
REACH members learn about ways to engage with local government

At the request of the Rural Empowerment Association for Community HELP (REACH), Center for Civil Rights summer interns Daniel Kale, 2nd year UNC Law student, and UNC undergraduate Kendall Cox, with the Center’s new Attorney-Fellow, Allen Buansi, gave a comprehensive overview of opportunities for residents in Duplin County to actively engage with their local government. REACH, made up of members of the local community who regularly gather to address issues of health and environment, invited the Center to present information and answer questions about voting and electoral requirements, election results (including voter turnout) in the most recent local government elections in Duplin County, and advisory boards and commissions appointed by elected officials. Two members of the Duplin County Board of Commissioners attended in this Community Civic Engagement Training, and expressed thanks to the Center for bringing much-needed technical support and information to their constituents.


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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Tue. July 18, 2017 3:13 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, General, Law Students, Next Generation Series

Rogers Road Remediation: A Promise Finally Fulfilled

Rev. Campbell speaks to a packed RENA Community Center at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
Rev. Robert Campbell speaks to a packed RENA Community Center at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
David Caldwell addresses the crowd at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
Mr. David Caldwell addresses the crowd at the Groundbreaking Ceremony.
After a 45-year-long struggle, the Rogers-Eubanks community saw the promise of environmental justice at last fulfilled. On June 21, the Rogers Eubanks Neighborhood Association (RENA) Community Center hosted the groundbreaking ceremony for the construction of sewer infrastructure in Rogers-Eubanks, a 155-year-old, majority African American community in Orange County, NC.
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Posted by Allen K. Buansi on Fri. June 23, 2017 10:37 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Pitt County, Race Discrimination

Center receives Stella J. Adams Fair Housing Advocate Award

Lewis Dozier, the president of the Royal Oaks Concerned Citizens Association and the Center for Civil Rights, each awarded the Stella J. Adams Award.
Lewis Dozier, the president of the Royal Oaks Concerned Citizens Association and the Center for Civil Rights, each awarded the Stella J. Adams Award.

On April 28th, the Center’s staff attended the 14th annual Fair Housing Conference organized by the City of Raleigh, the Raleigh Fair Housing Hearing Board, and the Fair Housing Project of Legal Aid of North Carolina. Distinguished advocates discussed the rights and remedies available under the Fair Housing Act for victims of illegal discrimination, as well as reforms needed in the criminal background screening process for housing applicants. The Center’s Executive Director Ted Shaw gave a rousing keynote address. At the end of the conference, the Royal Oak Concerned Citizens Association and the UNC Center for Civil Rights were awarded the 2017 Stella J. Adams Fair Housing Advocate Award in recognition of their environmental justice advocacy on behalf of residents of Royal Oak, an African American community in Brunswick County. Read more about that advocacy here.


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Posted by Allen K. Buansi on Mon. May 1, 2017 2:06 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing

State of Exclusion: Profile on Orange County

Orange-Cover

Following the 2013 State of Exclusion report, the UNC Center for Civil Rights released a series of county profiles, containing a more in-depth examination of exclusion and the legacy of racial segregation in the individual counties. The fifth in the series, Orange County, is released today. This report, the other county reports, and the statewide report, are all available at www.uncinclusionproject.org.

Nestled in the Raleigh-Durham metropolitan area, Orange County boasts three prosperous towns, a low unemployment rate and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Behind this prosperity lies a sharp divide between rich and poor, often along racial lines. As the county has grown, the cost of living has increased and the African American population has declined. The result is outward migration from traditional African American neighborhoods and the county as a whole.

The county’s remaining non-white population disproportionately live in areas with close proximity to solid waste or other potentially polluting facilities. Compared to other wealthy counties or to the state, Orange County has a smaller exposure rate to solid waste facilities for its overall population (3.20% compared to 5.34% statewide), but a higher rate for super majority non-white census blocks (16.72% compared to 9.37%). Additionally, racially identifiable excluded communities still have difficulty obtaining the infrastructure to supply water and sewer access. The County has been working with the cities to address this issue, but it is a slow process.


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Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Thu. March 9, 2017 4:14 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Orange County, Race Discrimination

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project: Education Advocacy in New Hanover County

The above map shows clusters of Census blocks in Wilmington where 75% or more of residents are non-white.  A statewide map is available at http://www.uncinclusionproject.org/.

The above map shows clusters of Census blocks in Wilmington where 75% or more of residents are non-white. A statewide map is available at http://www.uncinclusionproject.org/.

In New Hanover County, public school officials continue to grapple with the tension between promoting racial and socio-economic diversity in schools and the political pressure of suburban parents who favor an assignment plan that emphasizes proximity, often referred to as a “neighborhood school” plan. That term can be misleading when only certain neighborhoods are prioritized, and ignores the reality that such assignment plans reinforce patterns of residential segregation and sacrifice the educational benefits of racially and socio-economically diverse schools. In its new Inclusion Project report, the UNC Center for Civil Rights describes direct community-based, education advocacy in New Hanover County. The Inclusion Project grew out of the Center’s community-based advocacy focused on addressing structural inequities and promoting racial equity and inclusion. The project began in 2013 with the release of “The State of Exclusion” report, and includes a series of county profiles analyzing the continuing impacts of the legacy of racial segregation.


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Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Tue. September 6, 2016 12:03 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education

Mass Incarceration: A Civil Rights Crisis

The United States has merely 5% of the world’s population, yet nearly 25% of the world’s prisoners.

North Carolina Advocates for Justice hosted a conference in October 2015, presented by the North Carolina Commission on Racial and Ethnic Disparities (NC-CRED), titled “Understanding Mass Incarceration.”

The presentations highlighted the serious problems that remain deeply imbedded in the American criminal “justice” system; one presenter went as far as saying that he never referred to it as the criminal justice system, and instead opted for the more realistic phrase, “criminal legal system.” The problem of mass incarceration was referred to as a civil rights crisis, as it negatively affects access to housing, employment, voting, and education.

Blog by: Maria Lopez Delgado, 3L, UNC School of Law


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Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Fri. November 20, 2015 2:34 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Criminal Justice, Law Students, Race Discrimination

Brunswick County Landfill Case Settles

Clients and counsel celebrate after settling the Brunswick County case

The Royal Oak case resolved on June 16, 2014 with Brunswick County’s approval of the settlement agreement in ROCCA et. al. v. Brunswick County.


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Posted by Elizabeth M. Haddix on Fri. September 5, 2014 4:32 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Race Discrimination

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project Spotlight on Exclusion in Jones County

Jones County Report

Trenton, the smallest town in sparsely populated Jones County is not known for much, but made headlines in 1999 for a civil rights struggle to annex excluded communities. This latest report (PDF) documents the progress and persistent obstacles to racial integration in Trenton and across the county. With this installment, the UNC Center for Civil Rights continues its series of county level profiles on the legacy of racial segregation. Building on last year's statewide State of Exclusion report (PDF), this series includes reports on Lenoir (PDF), Davidson (PDF), and Moore (PDF) counties; all are available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. July 11, 2014 11:31 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Fair Housing, Segregation, Voting Rights

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues its series of county level profiles on the legacy of racial segregation, focusing this time on Moore County (PDF). Building on last year’s statewide State of Exclusion report (PDF), this series includes prior reports on Lenoir (PDF) and Davidson (PDF) counties; all are available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

Moore County, in the southern part of the Piedmont of North Carolina, is the center of the Sandhills region, known today primarily for its luxurious golf resorts, especially Pinehurst, home to this year’s U.S. Open Golf Tournament. Despite significant strides, Moore County remains nearly as deeply divided as described by the New York Times in 2005, the last time it hosted a U.S. Open. Most basic amenities have been extended to the excluded communities nearest the wealthiest golf resorts, but when looking at the county as a whole, racial and economic segregation persists. This report focuses on the impact of racial segregation on affordable housing, public education, environmental justice, and access to municipal services. The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues to represent several excluded communities in the county; the history of the Center’s work there informs the report, but like prior reports all conclusions are based upon publically available data.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. June 6, 2014 4:07 PM
Categories: Annexation, Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Moore County, Race Discrimination, Segregation, Voting Rights

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project Spotlight on Exclusion in Davidson County

Profile on Davidson County

Following last year’s State of Exclusion report, in March the UNC Center for Civil Rights released a profile on Lenoir County (PDF), the first in a series of in-depth examinations of exclusion and the legacy of racial segregation in individual counties. Today we are releasing the second profile in that series on Davidson County (PDF). This release, the study on Lenoir County, and last year’s statewide report, are all available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

Between the Charlotte and Triad metropolitan areas, Davidson County is divided between its mostly white rural population and the more concentrated African American populations in the cities of Lexington and Thomasville. This report focuses on the impact of racial segregation on affordable housing, public education, political representation, and utility service. Almost all subsidized housing in Davidson County is clustered in Lexington and Thomasville, with very little subsidized housing available anywhere else in the county. One effect of clustering subsidized housing in already concentrated areas of poverty and non-white population is to exclude African Americans, Latinos, and low wealth residents from neighborhoods of higher opportunity that have greater access to employment, higher median incomes, and better educational opportunities. This county-wide pattern of exclusion perpetuates racial segregation and frustrates the purposes of the Fair Housing Act.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Mon. April 28, 2014 3:12 PM
Categories: Annexation, Community Inclusion, Education, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination, Segregation, Voting Rights
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