Blog Posts: Environmental Justice

Brunswick County Landfill Case Settles

Clients and Counsel Celebrate
Clients and counsel celebrate after settling the Brunswick County case

The Royal Oak case resolved on June 16, 2014 with Brunswick County’s approval of the settlement agreement in ROCCA et. al. v. Brunswick County.


Read More...
Posted by Elizabeth M. Haddix on Fri. September 5, 2014 4:32 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Race Discrimination

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues its series of county level profiles on the legacy of racial segregation, focusing this time on Moore County. Building on last year’s statewide State of Exclusion report, this series includes prior reports on Lenoir and Davidson counties; all are available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

Moore County, in the southern part of the Piedmont of North Carolina, is the center of the Sandhills region, known today primarily for its luxurious golf resorts, especially Pinehurst, home to this year’s U.S. Open Golf Tournament. Despite significant strides, Moore County remains nearly as deeply divided as described by the New York Times in 2005, the last time it hosted a U.S. Open. Most basic amenities have been extended to the excluded communities nearest the wealthiest golf resorts, but when looking at the county as a whole, racial and economic segregation persists. This report focuses on the impact of racial segregation on affordable housing, public education, environmental justice, and access to municipal services. The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues to represent several excluded communities in the county; the history of the Center’s work there informs the report, but like prior reports all conclusions are based upon publically available data.


Read More...
Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. June 6, 2014 4:07 PM
Categories: Annexation, Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Moore County, Race Discrimination, Segregation, Voting Rights

NC Court of Appeals Allows Deposition of Former County Manager in Brunswick Environmental Justice Case

On April 1, 2014, the North Carolina Court of Appeals dismissed Brunswick County’s consolidated appeal of two trial court orders compelling the County to produce former County Manager Marty Lawing for deposition. This appeal is the second of two filed by the County, both of which have now been dismissed by the Court of Appeals. The first appeal involved the County's motion to dismiss the case, which the trial court denied.


Read More...
Posted by Bethan R. Eynon on Tue. April 1, 2014 9:38 AM
Categories: Brunswick County, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing

Environmental injustice in NC extends its unhealthy reach across North Carolina, especially in African American communities

This post was originally posted on the Progressive Pulse by Tazra Mitchell of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center at the N.C. Justice Center on Thursday, February 28, 2014.

Place Matters

Imagine living in a community that includes the most undesirable and hazardous amenities a place has to offer such as a waste transfer station, a sewage treatment plant, and several landfills. Now, imagine being represented by county officials who decide to provide water and sewer services to an animal shelter but not to the residents—who happen to be more than three-quarters African American. And, these facilities primarily serve the majority-white residents in adjacent communities. Unfortunately, the residents of Royal Oak in Brunswick County don’t have to imagine this; they face this reality every day.


Read More...
Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Wed. March 5, 2014 3:22 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Race Discrimination, Segregation

Data shows clear disparities between majority minority communities and the surroundings

This post was originally posted on the Progressive Pulse on Monday, February 24, 2014.

Place Matters

The previous post in this series, Place Matters, laid out the importance of place-based strategies to address inequality across North Carolina. Geographic solutions must be guided by precise data to target specific solutions to particular communities. The State of Exclusion report is a first step in using available statewide data to identify specific communities and the issues they face.


Read More...
Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Wed. February 26, 2014 2:10 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination

Place Matters

This post was originally posted on the Progressive Pulse by Alexandra Sirota, the Director of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center at the N.C. Justice Center on Thursday, February 20, 2014.


Place Matters

In research released last year, the UNC Center for Civil Rights builds a compelling case for how our built environment truly reflects (or doesn’t) equality of opportunity in North Carolina, particularly for communities of color.


Read More...
Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Mon. February 24, 2014 4:27 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination

Update on Brunswick County Environmental Justice Case

Court of Appeals

On November 13, 2013, Plaintiffs requested the trial court to enter a stay of all trial court litigation pending the North Carolina Court of Appeals’ decisions in the County’s three interlocutory appeals. The Rule 2.1 Judge assigned to the case, the Honorable Thomas Lock, granted Plaintiffs' request.


Read More...
Posted by Bethan R. Eynon on Mon. January 13, 2014 2:52 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Environmental Justice

This didn't happen by accident - by Rob Schofield from NC Policy Watch

Powerful new study reveals the depths of segregation in NC and the need for intentional action to address it

Sometimes, it’s hard to say what divides North Carolinians more: race or what to do about race. A new and powerful report by some data wonks at the University of North Carolina helps to shine a light on both of these divisions. The report is entitled “The State of Exclusion: An Empirical Analysis of the Legacy of Segregated Communities in North Carolina” and the portrait it paints is not an especially encouraging one.

A team led by researcher Peter Gilbert examined hundreds of “census blocks” and population “clusters” throughout the state in an attempt to explore and explain some of the key aspects of North Carolina’s readily-evident residential segregation by race:
Where does it exist? Why does it exist? What are its impacts?

What they found shouldn’t surprise us, but it should serve as a wake-up call to all North Carolinians of good will. The three-pronged message:

  1. Despite decades of important progress, North Carolina remains intensely segregated in many, many areas.
  2. This segregation produces significant and measurable negative consequences.
  3. Ignoring the problem won’t make it go away.

Read the executive summary of the report.

This post was re-posted from NC Policy Watch. - It was written by Rob Schofield


Read More...
No Comments | Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Wed. September 18, 2013 10:14 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Segregation, Voting Rights

Next Generation Series: Orange County Landfill Closing Is A Victory for the Rogers-Eubanks Commmunity

Each year, the Center hosts law student interns for the summer, fall, and spring semesters, as part of its mission to train the next generation of civil rights lawyers. This blog post is part of the Next Generation Series, which include reflections from our interns on their assigned casework. Read more about our current and past interns.

The historic Rogers-Eubanks community claimed a long overdue victory when the Orange County Landfill closed on Saturday, June 29, 2013, forty-one years after it opened. With a slow click of the master lock held by three community members – David Caldwell, Gertrude Nunn and the Reverend Robert Campbell – the landfill gates were secured.

Rogers-Eubanks community members prepare to lock the landfill gates. The signs they hold read, "Thanks Orange County for Closing This Landfill, Let's Keep It Closed Forever. Reject NC Senate Bill 328."

Read More...
Posted by Bethan R. Eynon on Wed. July 10, 2013 4:36 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Next Generation Series, Orange County

Senate Bill 328 Threatens Fundamental Fairness and Entrenches Racial Disparities in the Siting of Solid Waste Facilities

Senate Bill 328 seeks to remove the requirement that the NC Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) consider the cumulative impact of solid waste facilities on minority or low-income communities in determining whether to issue a permit for those facilities. The bill is currently in the Senate and quickly making its way through the legislative process, and is the latest in a series of proposed legislation this session which seek to repeal or narrow statutes enacted to prevent the perpetuation of racial discrimination.


Read More...
Posted by Jennifer Watson Marsh on Mon. June 10, 2013 12:12 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Race Discrimination
1 2 3 

Administrator Login

UNC School of Law | Van Hecke-Wettach Hall | 160 Ridge Road, CB #3380 | Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380 | 919.962.5106


If you are seeing this, you are either using a non-graphical browser or Netscape 4.x (4.7, 4.8, etc.) and this page appears very plain. If you are using a 4.x version of Netscape, this site is fully functional but lacks styles and optimizations available in other browsers. For full functionality, please upgrade your browser to the latest version of Internet Explorer or Firefox.