Blog Posts: Fair Housing

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project Spotlight on Exclusion in Jones County

Jones County Report

Trenton, the smallest town in sparsely populated Jones County is not known for much, but made headlines in 1999 for a civil rights struggle to annex excluded communities. This latest report (PDF) documents the progress and persistent obstacles to racial integration in Trenton and across the county. With this installment, the UNC Center for Civil Rights continues its series of county level profiles on the legacy of racial segregation. Building on last year's statewide State of Exclusion report (PDF), this series includes reports on Lenoir (PDF), Davidson (PDF), and Moore (PDF) counties; all are available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. July 11, 2014 11:31 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Fair Housing, Segregation, Voting Rights

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

State of Exclusion: Profile on Moore County

The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues its series of county level profiles on the legacy of racial segregation, focusing this time on Moore County (PDF). Building on last year’s statewide State of Exclusion report (PDF), this series includes prior reports on Lenoir (PDF) and Davidson (PDF) counties; all are available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

Moore County, in the southern part of the Piedmont of North Carolina, is the center of the Sandhills region, known today primarily for its luxurious golf resorts, especially Pinehurst, home to this year’s U.S. Open Golf Tournament. Despite significant strides, Moore County remains nearly as deeply divided as described by the New York Times in 2005, the last time it hosted a U.S. Open. Most basic amenities have been extended to the excluded communities nearest the wealthiest golf resorts, but when looking at the county as a whole, racial and economic segregation persists. This report focuses on the impact of racial segregation on affordable housing, public education, environmental justice, and access to municipal services. The UNC Center for Civil Rights continues to represent several excluded communities in the county; the history of the Center’s work there informs the report, but like prior reports all conclusions are based upon publically available data.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. June 6, 2014 4:07 PM
Categories: Annexation, Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Moore County, Race Discrimination, Segregation, Voting Rights

UNC Center for Civil Rights Inclusion Project Spotlight on Exclusion in Davidson County

Profile on Davidson County

Following last year’s State of Exclusion report, in March the UNC Center for Civil Rights released a profile on Lenoir County (PDF), the first in a series of in-depth examinations of exclusion and the legacy of racial segregation in individual counties. Today we are releasing the second profile in that series on Davidson County (PDF). This release, the study on Lenoir County, and last year’s statewide report, are all available at www.uncinclusionproject.org. Profiles of additional counties will follow in the coming weeks, each highlighting particular aspects of that county’s history, ongoing impacts of exclusion, and progress toward full inclusion of all residents.

Between the Charlotte and Triad metropolitan areas, Davidson County is divided between its mostly white rural population and the more concentrated African American populations in the cities of Lexington and Thomasville. This report focuses on the impact of racial segregation on affordable housing, public education, political representation, and utility service. Almost all subsidized housing in Davidson County is clustered in Lexington and Thomasville, with very little subsidized housing available anywhere else in the county. One effect of clustering subsidized housing in already concentrated areas of poverty and non-white population is to exclude African Americans, Latinos, and low wealth residents from neighborhoods of higher opportunity that have greater access to employment, higher median incomes, and better educational opportunities. This county-wide pattern of exclusion perpetuates racial segregation and frustrates the purposes of the Fair Housing Act.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Mon. April 28, 2014 3:12 PM
Categories: Annexation, Community Inclusion, Education, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination, Segregation, Voting Rights

NC Court of Appeals Allows Deposition of Former County Manager in Brunswick Environmental Justice Case

On April 1, 2014, the North Carolina Court of Appeals dismissed Brunswick County’s consolidated appeal of two trial court orders compelling the County to produce former County Manager Marty Lawing for deposition. This appeal is the second of two filed by the County, both of which have now been dismissed by the Court of Appeals. The first appeal involved the County's motion to dismiss the case, which the trial court denied.


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Posted by Bethan R. Eynon on Tue. April 1, 2014 9:38 AM
Categories: Brunswick County, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing

Data shows clear disparities between majority minority communities and the surroundings

This post was originally posted on the Progressive Pulse on Monday, February 24, 2014.

Place Matters

The previous post in this series, Place Matters, laid out the importance of place-based strategies to address inequality across North Carolina. Geographic solutions must be guided by precise data to target specific solutions to particular communities. The State of Exclusion report (PDF) is a first step in using available statewide data to identify specific communities and the issues they face.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Wed. February 26, 2014 2:10 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination

Place Matters

This post was originally posted on the Progressive Pulse by Alexandra Sirota, the Director of the North Carolina Budget and Tax Center at the N.C. Justice Center on Thursday, February 20, 2014.


Place Matters

In research released last year, the UNC Center for Civil Rights builds a compelling case for how our built environment truly reflects (or doesn’t) equality of opportunity in North Carolina, particularly for communities of color.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Mon. February 24, 2014 4:27 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination

Raleigh Proposes to Sell off Public Housing; Fair Housing Advocates Oppose Plan

On Tuesday January 21, the Raleigh City Council voted 7-1 to approve the Raleigh Housing Authority’s (RHA) plan to sell 60 units of subsidized low-income housing and turn them into “market-rate” homes. The homes are in Capitol Park, formerly Halifax Court, on the north side of downtown Raleigh. The homes were originally constructed about 15 years ago using money from a federal HOPE VI grant. The RHA plans to sell the 60 units for $300,000, a tiny fraction of their tax value of $8 million. The plan also calls for the loss of an additional 115 public housing units in diverse areas across Raleigh.


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Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Fri. February 21, 2014 3:28 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination, Wake County

This didn't happen by accident - by Rob Schofield from NC Policy Watch

Powerful new study reveals the depths of segregation in NC and the need for intentional action to address it

Sometimes, it’s hard to say what divides North Carolinians more: race or what to do about race. A new and powerful report by some data wonks at the University of North Carolina helps to shine a light on both of these divisions. The report is entitled “The State of Exclusion: An Empirical Analysis of the Legacy of Segregated Communities in North Carolina” (PDF) and the portrait it paints is not an especially encouraging one.

A team led by researcher Peter Gilbert examined hundreds of “census blocks” and population “clusters” throughout the state in an attempt to explore and explain some of the key aspects of North Carolina’s readily-evident residential segregation by race:
Where does it exist? Why does it exist? What are its impacts?

What they found shouldn’t surprise us, but it should serve as a wake-up call to all North Carolinians of good will. The three-pronged message:

  1. Despite decades of important progress, North Carolina remains intensely segregated in many, many areas.
  2. This segregation produces significant and measurable negative consequences.
  3. Ignoring the problem won’t make it go away.

Read the executive summary of the report (PDF).

This post was re-posted from NC Policy Watch. - It was written by Rob Schofield


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No Comments | Posted by Peter Hull Gilbert on Wed. September 18, 2013 10:14 AM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Segregation, Voting Rights

SAVE THE DATES! Two-Part "Race and Civil Rights" conference

The NAACP Legal Defense Fund and the UNC Center for Civil Rights are hosting a two-part conference this summer and fall designed to engage the nation's leading civil rights and racial justice advocates.


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Posted by Mark Dorosin on Fri. April 12, 2013 1:56 PM
Categories: Community Inclusion, Criminal Justice, Education, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Juvenile Justice, Race and the Law Series, Race Discrimination, Segregation

Another Victory for Royal Oak

ROCCA members with counsel after March 2013 Hearing

On March 15, 2013, Judge Lock denied Defendant’s Motion to Reconsider the Court’s September 13, 2012 denial of Defendant’s Motion to Dismiss Plaintiffs’ Fair Housing Act claims.


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Posted by Elizabeth M. Haddix on Mon. March 18, 2013 3:42 PM
Categories: Brunswick County, Community Inclusion, Environmental Justice, Fair Housing, Race Discrimination
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