Blog | North Carolina Journal of International Law

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Posted by John A. Sorenson (Adam) on Thu. November 10, 2016 9:12 AM
Categories: North Carolina

The Madrid Protocol: Expanding Trademark Protection for Thai Marks

A blog on Thailand's recent accession to the Madrid Protocol, what the Madrid Protocol is, how Thailand amended its Trademark Act, and what this means for the future of trademarks in Thailand and Madrid Protocol nations.
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No Comments | Posted by Maria T. Cannon on Mon. October 24, 2016 8:00 AM
Categories: Madrid Protocol, Thailand

The U.N. Decides to Step Up in Yemen

After taking the sidelines for much of the Yemen Civil War, the U.N. has decided it is time to hold someone accountable for the human rights violations so prevalent in the country.
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No Comments | Posted by Christopher P. Callahan on Mon. October 17, 2016 8:00 AM
Categories: United Nations, Yemen

Why Can't the U.S. Just Take Iraq's Oil?

With the recent comments from a United States' Presidential Candidate claiming that the U.S. should just take Iraq's oil as we leave to help pay for financial losses in the world, the question of the legality of these proposed actions takes center stage.
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No Comments | Posted by Joseph M. Brook on Thu. October 13, 2016 11:01 AM
Categories: International Court of Justice, Iraq

What the Paris Agreement Means Post-Ratification

With the Paris Agreement heading toward ratification and the time when it will actually take force, questions surround Obama's ratification of the agreement and whether it will be binding on the United States.
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No Comments | Posted by Ethan C. Blumenthal on Tue. October 11, 2016 9:22 AM
Categories: Climate Change, Paris Agreement

GMO Regulation: Find Out Why the U.S. Finally Joined the International Fray

With the signing of a new law on July 29th, President Obama created the National Bioengineered Food Disclosure Standard, adding an amendment to the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946 and bringing the U.S. forward in the recent trend of GMO regulation. The international community, however, has been addressing biosafety concerns related to GMOs for over a decade. This blog compares the new law with international standards and the Cartagena Protocol.
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No Comments | Posted by Amanda L. Aragon on Sat. October 1, 2016 11:14 AM
Categories: Food and agriculture, GMO

Prof. Ann Estin on child welfare in abduction and asylum proceedings

Numbers of unaccompanied minors taken into custody at the United States's southern border have nearly doubled in the last year. The dramatic increase has strained U.S. courts, particularly where international legal obligations are involved. University of Iowa law Prof. Ann Estin argues that U.S. courts are up to the challenge.

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No Comments | Posted by Elizabeth M. Hutchens on Mon. August 1, 2016 8:00 AM
Categories: Children's rights, Conflict of Laws, Hague Convention, Refugees/Asylum, Symposium

Exploring the Hague Abduction Convention Through Halabi’s Lens

In an article published in the North Carolina Journal of International Law’s symposium issue, Sam F. Halabi explores why federal courts decline to assert subject-matter jurisdiction over enforcement of visitation rights under the International Child Abduction Remedies Act (ICARA), despite asserting jurisdiction over another remedy: return of a child to his or her habitual residence. Ultimately, Halabi contends that neither the treaty nor the statute justifies the federal courts’ refusal to hear access claims.

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No Comments | Posted by Margaret D. Petersen on Fri. July 29, 2016 8:00 AM
Categories: Children's rights, Hague Convention, Symposium

The Hague Abduction Convention and Japan's nebulous family law

Japan's uniquely vague body of family law was a key reason why it didn't ratify the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction until 2014, more than a decade after most other developed democracies. In a forthcoming ILJ article, Hofstra University law Prof. Barbara Stark argues that Japanese society's preference for sole maternal custody is likely to become clearer as its courts apply the Convention.

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No Comments | Posted by Jennie L. Cunningham on Thu. May 12, 2016 1:56 PM
Categories: Children's rights, Hague Convention, Japan

Time for more bite and less bark in climate change laws

While talks regarding climate change are necessary, action is what is really needed. The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea provides a potential for enforcement of climate change laws in that any member state that is not abiding by the obligations it agreed to is vulnerable to a suit under the UNCLOS for its discretions. However, nothing can change until the major players come to the table and agree to take action and be bound by their talks.


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No Comments | Posted by Brooklyn Hildebrandt on Wed. April 13, 2016 3:44 PM
Categories: Climate Change

Savage v. Zelent and N.C.'s Foreign-Country Money Judgments Recognition Act

In Savage v. Zelent, the North Carolina Court of Appeals decided an issue of first impression, upholding the trial court’s recognition of an £148,516.75 attorneys’ fee award from Scotland and providing insight into the interpretation of North Carolina's new Foreign-Country Money Judgments Recognition Act.
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No Comments | Posted by Alexandra J. Portaro on Thu. April 7, 2016 10:17 AM
Categories: North Carolina

Africa is getting a free trade zone, but when?

African Heads of Government met at the 25th Summit of the African Union and agreed to the creation of the Continental Free Trade Area with a 2017 implementation date, but experts wonder if 2017 is a realistic goal. 
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No Comments | Posted by George H. Ricks on Mon. April 4, 2016 4:00 PM
Categories: Africa, African Union, Free Trade

EU-Turkey Agreement: is the EU's refugee return program legal?

Under the new EU-Turkey agreement, all illegal migrants arriving in the EU from Turkey will be returned, but t he EU must be careful that its ultimate goal of curbing the migrant influx through mass deportation does not overshadow its obligation under international law to respect migrants’ rights.
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No Comments | Posted by Keturah T. Reed on Thu. March 31, 2016 9:00 PM
Categories: European Union, Refugees/Asylum, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts)

Why journal? Write about international law, practice professionalism

Irrespective of its particular subject matter, a journal is a terrific setting to begin building a reputation for professionalism, reliability, and thoughtfulness. My fellow-editors have been my first set of colleagues in our profession, and also my first set of clients. 
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No Comments | Posted by Christopher R. Bagley (Chris) on Mon. March 28, 2016 7:34 PM
Categories: International Law

The motivations for and mechanics of a “Brexit”

Brits are about to make the most important decision on the UK's sovereignty in four decades: whether to remain in the EU or withdraw in a so-called “Brexit.” Here's how a Brexit would look under Article 50 of the Treaty on the European Union.

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No Comments | Posted by Joseph A. Fleishman on Mon. March 21, 2016 10:21 PM
Categories: European Union, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United Kingdom
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