Blog Posts: China

Ruling on Philippines' arbitration claim against China may be a milestone

The UN Permanent Court of Arbitration decided on October 29th to hear The Philippines’ case against China regarding alleged violations of the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea in the Spratly Islands. The case will mark the first use of UNCLOS's dispute-resolution provisions in the South China Sea. Will it be a first step toward China's acceptance of arbitration to enforce international law?
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No Comments | Posted by Jason M. Frocht on Thu. December 17, 2015 1:33 AM
Categories: China, International Dispute Resolution, Natural resources, Philippines, Territorial disputes

Filipino fisherman file claim against China for denying "any port in a storm"

Sixteen Filipino fishermen are asking the U.N. High Commissioner on Human Rights to intervene, alleging that Chinese mariners denied them entry to calm waters during harsh weather, shot at them with water cannons, rammed their boats, and even chased them with machine guns.


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No Comments | Posted by Bethany A. Boring on Tue. October 6, 2015 12:23 AM
Categories: China, Customary International Law, Philippines, Southeast Asia, Territorial disputes

The Nicaragua Canal’s Contractual Plan for Displacement of Autonomous People Sparks Cries of Human Rights Violations

In 2012, Nicaragua’s parliament passed a law formally allowing for the construction of the Nicaragua Interoceanic Canal to compete with the smaller Panama Canal. The route passes through the second largest primary tropical rainforest in Central America and the homelands of thousands of indigenous and Afro-Caribbean people. While the Nicaraguan government and HKND have assured people that anyone displaced for the project will be fairly compensated, human rights groups have cried foul and many demonstrations have sprung up around the country protesting the anticipated forced removal.


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Posted by Jacob G. Oakes on Fri. April 17, 2015 6:30 PM
Categories: China, Direct foreign investment, International Human Rights, Latin America, Nicaragua, Shipping

China's "Great Wall of Sand": China's quest to strengthen its sovereignty in the South China Sea

China is constructing a “Great Wall of Sand” through a program of land reclamation near the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. In recent months, China has created 1.5 square miles of artificial landmasses by pumping sand onto live coral reefs and paving them over with concrete.


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No Comments | Posted by Rachel Brunswig on Thu. April 9, 2015 2:21 PM
Categories: China, Territorial disputes

A 21st Century Model for U.S. Nuclear Policy

The United States has been in high-stakes negotiations with Iran in recent months over the rollback of Iran's nuclear program. The agreement would place severe restrictions on Iran’s ability to accrue and enrich uranium beyond a specified level for ten years.


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Posted by Joseph Ho Kim (Joe) on Thu. March 19, 2015 12:59 PM
Categories: China, Energy, Israel, Nuclear weapons, Pakistan, South Korea, WMD

Philippines v. China and the Failure to Appear

On 22 January 2013, the Republic of the Philippines sued the People’s Republic of China in the Permanent Court of Arbitration under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“Convention”) over a territorial dispute in the West Philippine Sea, a portion of the South China Sea that falls within the Philippines’s exclusive economic zone.


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Posted by William R. Hartzell (Will) on Wed. January 21, 2015 11:03 AM
Categories: China, Philippines, Southeast Asia, Territorial disputes, United Nations

Antidumping Laws Considered

On Friday, November 14, the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) found importers from China and Indonesia in violation of anti-dumping regulations for selling monosodium glutamate (MSG) at unfairly low prices in the United States. The large discrepancy between Ajinomoto’s alleged margins and Commerce’s final margins, as well as the discrepancy between initial and final margins for the China MSG, highlight a concern many have when it comes to antidumping laws: distortion of the market.


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No Comments | Posted by Matthew P. Margiotta on Wed. November 26, 2014 3:29 PM
Categories: China, Food and agriculture, Free Trade, United States

Panama Canal May Face Competition for the Future of Global Trade

Now a century old, the Panama Canal is undergoing a massive renovation in order to accommodate more ships, and larger ships. Will that be enough to stave off a potential new competitor canal? 


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No Comments | Posted by Benjamin A. Evans (Ben) on Thu. February 6, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: China, Free Trade, Latin America, Nicaragua, Shipping

China's Loosening One Child Policy: Motivations and Implications

Since 1979, the People’s Republic of China has enforced laws restricting the number of children had by Chinese couples in an effort to stem the social, economic, and environmental challenges created by the nation’s exploding population. Noncompliance results in hefty fines. Implementation of this “family planning” policy has seen much criticism for its perceived human rights intrusions of family development and potential to reinforce gender bias. Present laws limit many couples to having a single child, but allow a second child if couples live in rural regions and have only a daughter, are of a minority ethnicity, or have no siblings themselves. But, change is coming.


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No Comments | Posted by Peter B. von Stein on Thu. January 16, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: China, Customary International Law, Population control/management
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