Blog Posts: Direct foreign investment

Canada and EU inch toward massive trade and investment pact

Canada and the European Union are poised to conclude their largest trade agreement ever.
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No Comments | Posted by Amanda R. Dizon on Mon. March 14, 2016 2:11 AM
Categories: Canada, Direct foreign investment, European Union, Free Trade

EU proposal for TTIP trade deal: a new model for dispute resolution?

The European Commission's draft proposal aims to improve a system that is sometimes seen as allowing multinational corporations to evade regulations in the countries where they invest.


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1 Comment | Posted by Nicholas S. Millington on Fri. October 2, 2015 12:12 AM
Categories: Conflict of Laws, Direct foreign investment, European Union, Free Trade, International Dispute Resolution, United States

The Nicaragua Canal’s Contractual Plan for Displacement of Autonomous People Sparks Cries of Human Rights Violations

In 2012, Nicaragua’s parliament passed a law formally allowing for the construction of the Nicaragua Interoceanic Canal to compete with the smaller Panama Canal. The route passes through the second largest primary tropical rainforest in Central America and the homelands of thousands of indigenous and Afro-Caribbean people. While the Nicaraguan government and HKND have assured people that anyone displaced for the project will be fairly compensated, human rights groups have cried foul and many demonstrations have sprung up around the country protesting the anticipated forced removal.


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Posted by Jacob G. Oakes on Fri. April 17, 2015 6:30 PM
Categories: China, Direct foreign investment, International Human Rights, Latin America, Nicaragua, Shipping

Canada Makes Big Changes to Immigrant Investor Program

Canada created the Immigrant Investor Venture Capital (IIVC) Pilot Program. The Program requires immigrant investors to make a $2 million, non-guaranteed investment for 15 years into the IIVC fund, which will be used to invest in Canadian start-ups. Furthermore, each investor must have a net worth of at least $10 million.This is a similar stipulation used in other countries’ immigrant investor programs—the U.K. requires an individual to have $3.1 million to get a visa for investment into the country and Australia requires $12.3 million.


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Posted by Felicia M. Hyde on Sun. March 22, 2015 5:14 PM
Categories: Canada, Direct foreign investment, Immigration

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and Potential Data Privacy Issues

Representatives from the United States and the European Union met in Brussels for the 8th round of talks regarding the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). One of the ongoing issues related to TTIP has been data privacy. These issues stem from disparities between the United States’ and the EU’s treatment of data protection, wherein the EU recognizes that personal data is a fundamental right. The main intersection of privacy talks with respect to TTIP focuses on new proposed EU privacy regulations as well as the U.S.-EU Safe Harbor Program.


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Posted by Kevin E. Barnett on Mon. March 2, 2015 5:30 PM
Categories: Direct foreign investment, European Union, Free Trade, United States

Professor Rosen on Foreign Direct Investment: It's Not the End of the World

In 2012, financial crises abound, creating a worldwide problem and fueling the fear of an alleged fast-approaching Armageddon. Professor Ken Rosen of the University of Alabama School of Law argues one solution to our international contagion comes from, ironically, the source of the problem: the inexorable interdependence of the world’s nations. Specifically, Rosen suggests foreign direct investment [FDI] can ameliorate the global economic downturn. In his presentation, “Collaboration and Indirect Support of Foreign Direct Investment”, he argued the importance of FDI in growing the world’s suffering economy. Further, because our current framework for fostering FDI is flawed, he suggests a remodeled international approach that complies with global accounting standards and builds trust between nations.


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No Comments | Posted by Kathleen D. Bradshaw on Mon. February 27, 2012 8:58 AM
Categories: Direct foreign investment

Bilateral Investment Treaties and Foreign Direct Investment Arbitration: Analyzing Jason Yackee’s Solutions to Franchising in an International Setting

In the brave new world of dispute settlements between investors and states, international arbitration has emerged as a means to protect foreign direct investment (FDI). It is important that foreign direct investment is able to flow freely across borders and that a proper dispute mechanism is available to ensure fair and equitable treatment for all parties involved. However, the inadequacies of foreign legal systems, and the possibility of host state interference in the investor’s property rights, have created a greater desire for investors to seek a means to protect their investments. Jason Yackee, a Professor at the University of Wisconsin School of Law, has addressed this risk that direct investment abroad poses to its investors and has encouraged bilateral investment treaties (BITs) and investment treaty arbitration as a means for protecting their investments.


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No Comments | Posted by Gideon A. Kaplan on Sun. February 26, 2012 11:55 AM
Categories: Direct foreign investment, International Dispute Resolution, Symposium

The New State Capitalism: Will China's Evolving Financial System Serve as an Example for Reforms in the Western World?

At the conclusion of her presentation, Shruti Rana, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Maryland, left us with a final question: As the financial systems across the globe are in trouble, what will emerge: a stronger free market? Or the rise of state capitalism? According to her research, Professor Rana predicts that the structural changes to the financial system employed by the Chinese government will facilitate their rise to becoming a new global power and that China’s mixed public/private banking structure is the model for state capitalism of the modern world.


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No Comments | Posted by Naiema I. Blanchard on Sun. February 26, 2012 11:43 AM
Categories: Direct foreign investment, Symposium

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