Blog Posts: International Court of Justice

Why Can't the U.S. Just Take Iraq's Oil?

With the recent comments from a United States' Presidential Candidate claiming that the U.S. should just take Iraq's oil as we leave to help pay for financial losses in the world, the question of the legality of these proposed actions takes center stage.
Read More... (Why Can't the U.S. Just Take Iraq's Oil?)
No Comments | Posted by Joseph M. Brook on Thu. October 13, 2016 11:01 AM
Categories: International Court of Justice, Iraq

Colombian peace accord aims to balance justice, redress, and demobilization

A peace agreement between the Colombian government and the FARC rebel group would create two new courts to try war crimes from the country's fifty-year conflict.


Read More... (Colombian peace accord aims to balance justice, redress, and demobilization)
No Comments | Posted by Melodie Pellot-Hernandez on Sat. October 17, 2015 5:36 PM
Categories: Colombia, Drugs and other contraband, Insurgency, International Court of Justice, Latin America, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts)

A Lack of Intent: the Implications of the ICJ's Dismissal of Croatian and Serbian Genocide Claims

On February 3, the International Court of Justice (“ICJ”) dismissed Serbian and Croatian genocide claims based on actions taken during the Balkan Wars. The 17-2 dismissal of Croatia's genocide claims and the unanimous dismissal of Serbia's counterclaims showed a united front by the ICJ that the requisite intent was simply not present in either case.


Read More... (A Lack of Intent: the Implications of the ICJ's Dismissal of Croatian and Serbian Genocide Claims)
Posted by Patricia I. Heyen on Thu. March 5, 2015 3:28 PM
Categories: Genocide, International Court of Justice, International Human Rights

Chile, Peru, and the ICJ Boundary Settlement

On January 27, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) handed down its ruling in a border dispute between Chile and Peru. The decision affirms the ICJ's capacity to find equitable solutions to discrete international conflicts. Both Chile and Peru have claimed the decision as both a compromise and a victory, suggesting that the ICJ can be a powerful tool for improving international relations.


Read More... (Chile, Peru, and the ICJ Boundary Settlement)
No Comments | Posted by Peter H. Webb (Pete) on Mon. February 24, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Chile, International Court of Justice, Latin America, Peru, Territorial disputes

Administrator Login

UNC School of Law | Van Hecke-Wettach Hall | 160 Ridge Road, CB #3380 | Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3380 | 919.962.5106


If you are seeing this, you are either using a non-graphical browser or Netscape 4.x (4.7, 4.8, etc.) and this page appears very plain. If you are using a 4.x version of Netscape, this site is fully functional but lacks styles and optimizations available in other browsers. For full functionality, please upgrade your browser to the latest version of Internet Explorer or Firefox.