Blog Posts: Symposium

Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose: The more it changes, the more it’s the same thing.

“Comity” remains the most important principal governing recognition of foreign-country judgments; Professor Ronald Brand breathed new life into Hilton last month at the ILJ symposium. Brand, a professor of international law at Pitt, argued that long-ignored dictum from Hilton could help nations resolve their two fundamentally different approaches to judgment recognition.


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Posted by Christopher R. Bagley (Chris) on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:45 AM
Categories: Symposium

Multilateral Environmental Agreements and U.S. Judicial Review

The focus of Professor Knox’s discussion was the role of courts in reviewing multilateral environmental agreements, and whether or not the political question doctrine shields these agreements from judicial review.


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Posted by Lisa Marie Taylor (Lisa Marie) on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:41 AM
Categories: Symposium

Aaron Fellmuth on Leading From Behind: The United States and International Human Rights Law

Professor Fellmuth’s most provocative points concerned what he deemed to be the political misconception that the United States is a moral authority in human rights matters. On the domestic front, Fellmuth discussed how racial inequality, overwhelming and disparate incarceration rates, and near-oppressive levels of poverty blemish the United States. On the international level, Fellmuth faulted the United States’ for supporting countries with human rights abuses such as Saudi Arabia while condemning Iran, suggesting that our legitimacy cannot survive with such inconsistencies.


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Posted by Laura L. Campbell on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:38 AM
Categories: International Human Rights, Symposium

Killer Robots and the Legal Implications

Crootof details two concerns about autonomous weapons: (1) that the independence of the weapons creates liability issues; and, (2) that a democracy which is immune from feeling the human cost of war, would be emboldened to act and could potentially cause more conflict.


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Posted by Michael Dolan Berry on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:32 AM
Categories: South Korea, Symposium

Silent Terrorism: What is the International Community Doing to Control Boko Haram

While the world was focused on the media surrounding terrorist attacks in Paris, France, another Islamic terrorist organization, Boko Haram, massacred 2,000 residents of Baga, Nigeria. The terroristic acts of Boko Haram are not new for the terrorist organization considered the second deadliest in the world, only behind the Taliban.


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Posted by Christina L. Anderson on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:29 AM
Categories: African Union, International Human Rights, Symposium

Ronald Brand on the Importance of Judgement Recognition Among Nations

Professor Ronald Brand spoke on the importance of judgment recognition among nations at The North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation Symposium on Friday, January 30, 2015. His lecture, titled “Understanding Judgments Recognition,” highlighted the significant developments in this area over the past fifteen years in the European Union (EU), the United States, and on a global front.


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Posted by Jessica L. Watts on Fri. February 6, 2015 8:16 AM
Categories: International Dispute Resolution, Symposium

Symposium Review: Military Commissions - Are They Fair and Are They Really Working?

The current military commission system came into place when President Obama signed the Military Commissions Act of 2009. The use of military commissions is nothing new in the United States. Military commissions have been used since the Revolutionary War, when General George Washington put into place a Board of General Officers in order to determine whether a former soldier was a spy for Great Britain. There has been great debate over whether the detainees of Guantanamo and other detainees are being afforded due process of the law in these military commissions and whether military commissions have ever been successful in practice.


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No Comments | Posted by Zachary P. Ainsztein (Zach) on Fri. February 14, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Symposium

Symposium Review: Is There a Need for International Cyber Warfare Treaties?

During North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation’s 2014 symposium, various panelists offered their views on the growing area of cyber warfare. Cyber warfare is a relatively new development that is creating ethical and legal ambiguity under current international law. Modern international law recognizes the idea of jus ad bellum, literally translated to mean “right to war”. This theory determines situations when it is lawful to resort to war. The United States, and now most countries, claim . . .


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No Comments | Posted by Mark A. Kochuk on Thu. February 13, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Customary International Law, Cyberwarfare, Symposium

Symposium Review: Moving the Law of Armed Conflict from Crossbows to Cyber Attacks

Professor Eric Talbot Jensen gave a lecture titled: “The Future of the Law of Armed Conflict” at The North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation Symposium on Friday, January 31, 2014. Professor Jensen interspersed his entertaining and thought-provoking lecture with video clips of futuristic weaponry to drive home the point that our technology is developing at such a rapid pace that seemingly futuristic weapons are already within our grasp. As a result, if our laws do not develop to address the possibilities of new weapons that take forms and create harm in unconventional ways, we will be ill-equipped legally to face the threats and consequences of these new weapons.


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No Comments | Posted by Vineeth Shanker Hemavathi on Tue. February 11, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Customary International Law, Cyberwarfare, Symposium

Symposium Review: Sovereign Assumptions

The North Carolina Journal of International Law and Commercial Regulation (ILJ) at the University of North Carolina School of Law held their annual symposium this past week, focusing on “Emerging Issues in the Law of Armed Conflict and International Security.” The symposium allowed ILJ to draw from the state’s strong military ties and the state’s wide network of national security legal professionals.

Scholars from across the nation also contributed to the agenda for ILJ’s symposium. Professor Eric Talbot Jensen began the morning with his presentation entitled “The Future of the Law of Armed Conflict.” Jensen, of Brigham Young University School of Law and of Tallinn Manual notoriety, gave an early disclaimer regarding the difficulty of predicting the future, much less predicting the law that the future needs. Jensen continued to lay out a framework for how to best predict the laws needed for the future of armed conflict. Among Jensen’s thoughtful predictions were several assumptions, which Jensen himself readily acknowledged and welcomed feedback concerning his assumptions’ veracity.


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No Comments | Posted by William L. Thore (Logan) on Tue. February 11, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Customary International Law, Cyberwarfare, Symposium
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