Blog Posts: Territorial disputes

Ruling on Philippines' arbitration claim against China may be a milestone

The UN Permanent Court of Arbitration decided on October 29th to hear The Philippines’ case against China regarding alleged violations of the UN Convention of the Law of the Sea in the Spratly Islands. The case will mark the first use of UNCLOS's dispute-resolution provisions in the South China Sea. Will it be a first step toward China's acceptance of arbitration to enforce international law?
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No Comments | Posted by Jason M. Frocht on Thu. December 17, 2015 1:33 AM
Categories: China, International Dispute Resolution, Natural resources, Philippines, Territorial disputes

Filipino fisherman file claim against China for denying "any port in a storm"

Sixteen Filipino fishermen are asking the U.N. High Commissioner on Human Rights to intervene, alleging that Chinese mariners denied them entry to calm waters during harsh weather, shot at them with water cannons, rammed their boats, and even chased them with machine guns.


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No Comments | Posted by Bethany A. Boring on Tue. October 6, 2015 12:23 AM
Categories: China, Customary International Law, Philippines, Southeast Asia, Territorial disputes

Russian Territorial Claim Collides with Convention on the Law of the Sea

While Russia is no longer one of the world’s two preeminent superpowers, its most recent filing with a United Nations commission aims to cement its position as the superpower in the Arctic.


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No Comments | Posted by Joseph A. Fleishman on Fri. September 18, 2015 8:18 AM
Categories: Climate Change, Energy, Natural resources, Russia, Shipping, Territorial disputes

China's "Great Wall of Sand": China's quest to strengthen its sovereignty in the South China Sea

China is constructing a “Great Wall of Sand” through a program of land reclamation near the Spratly Islands in the South China Sea. In recent months, China has created 1.5 square miles of artificial landmasses by pumping sand onto live coral reefs and paving them over with concrete.


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No Comments | Posted by Rachel Brunswig on Thu. April 9, 2015 2:21 PM
Categories: China, Territorial disputes

Philippines v. China and the Failure to Appear

On 22 January 2013, the Republic of the Philippines sued the People’s Republic of China in the Permanent Court of Arbitration under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“Convention”) over a territorial dispute in the West Philippine Sea, a portion of the South China Sea that falls within the Philippines’s exclusive economic zone.


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Posted by William R. Hartzell (Will) on Wed. January 21, 2015 11:03 AM
Categories: China, Philippines, Southeast Asia, Territorial disputes, United Nations

Crimea is Only a Piece of a Much Larger Puzzle

Many of us who have been following the events unfolding in Ukraine for the past several weeks have experienced emotions ranging from apathy to horror. Regardless of the position of the rest of the international community, the Kremlin now says Ukraine’s Crimea region as a part of Russia. Many Ukrainians, including Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk, are understandably outraged, calling the contrived annexation "a robbery on an international scale." Others throughout the world, including many Americans, are still asking questions akin to, “why does this matter?” To understand why it matters, we must attempt to understand the motivations of the autocrat pulling the strings, Vladimir Putin.


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1 Comment | Posted by Cory R. Busker on Thu. April 3, 2014 1:00 PM
Categories: Russia, Territorial disputes, Ukraine

Chile, Peru, and the ICJ Boundary Settlement

On January 27, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) handed down its ruling in a border dispute between Chile and Peru. The decision affirms the ICJ's capacity to find equitable solutions to discrete international conflicts. Both Chile and Peru have claimed the decision as both a compromise and a victory, suggesting that the ICJ can be a powerful tool for improving international relations.


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No Comments | Posted by Peter H. Webb (Pete) on Mon. February 24, 2014 8:00 AM
Categories: Chile, International Court of Justice, Latin America, Peru, Territorial disputes

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