Blog Posts: United States

India: U.S. religious freedom envoy lacks locus standi

A delegation from the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF) was denied entry into India just days before its scheduled March 4 departure.  India’s rationale for denying the visas was that the USCIRF lacked locus standi, or the “capacity to sue and be sued in international adjudication proceedings,” a concept in international law that’s similar to Article III standing in U.S. federal court.
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No Comments | Posted by John A. Sorenson (Adam) on Sun. March 20, 2016 8:00 PM
Categories: India, Law of foreign and diplomatic relations, Standing, United States

A new, "safer" harbor for personal data transfer?

The U.S. Commerce Department and European Union officials have hammered out a new agreement to replace the "Safe Harbor" framework that the European Court of Justice invalidated in October. Will it do enough to protect EU citizens' privacy?
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No Comments | Posted by Sharon G. Lin on Thu. March 10, 2016 11:47 AM
Categories: Cyberlaw, European Union, Free Trade, United States

Kanpai! TPP could help Japanese craft brewers and U.S. grain growers

Japan's most widely available beers are clear, medium-bodied lagers, but its beer market is infamously opaque for craft brewers and importers. The Trans-Pacific Partnership would probably open that market for a wider variety of brews, especially those that use imported wheat and barley.

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No Comments | Posted by Kathleen M. Cusack (Katie) on Thu. February 18, 2016 2:05 AM
Categories: Food and agriculture, Free Trade, Japan, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United States

Commerce Dep't struggles to implement anti-cyberwar regs

A U.S. Commerce Department agency proposed export regulations to meet an international commitment to limit technologies that can be used for cyberattacks. But the agency withdrew the proposal after a barrage of criticism from the tech industry.
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No Comments | Posted by Joseph A. Fleishman on Wed. February 17, 2016 9:52 PM
Categories: Cyberwarfare, Free Trade, Intellectual property, International regulatory coordination, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United States

FIFA corruption scandal raises unique issues in extradition law

The FIFA scandal raises novel issues in the law of extradition and in U.S. courts' extraterritorial jurisdiction.
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No Comments | Posted by Joseph A. Fleishman on Sun. January 24, 2016 7:56 AM
Categories: Conflict of Laws, Corruption, Criminal Law, Extradition, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United States

WTO ruling threatens U.S. labels on dolphin-free tuna

The WTO Appellate Body recently declared the U.S. dolphin-safe labeling program for canned tuna discriminatory against Mexican tuna imports and in violation of the Agreement on Technical Barriers to Trade.
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No Comments | Posted by Amanda R. Dizon on Sat. January 9, 2016 12:38 PM
Categories: Conservation, Food and agriculture, Mexico, Natural resources, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United States, World Trade Organization

U.S. civil confinement clashes with U.K. and E.U. human-rights laws

Extradition of criminal suspects is supposed to be expeditious and routine. But the possibility of civil confinement after criminal sentences has been a stumbling block when U.S. authorities request extradition from the United Kingdom.
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No Comments | Posted by Melodie Pellot-Hernandez on Tue. December 15, 2015 8:55 PM
Categories: European Union, Extradition, International Human Rights, Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), United Kingdom, United States

Security Council resolutions fail to buttress common anti-ransom policy

Successive U.N. Security Council resolutions purport to ban ransom payments to terrorists. But a recent shift by the Obama administration has left the U.K. as the only major country with a strict no-negotiation policy.

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No Comments | Posted by Jennie L. Cunningham on Tue. November 24, 2015 9:36 AM
Categories: Reports (longer, analytical blog posts), Terrorism, U.N. Security Council, United Kingdom, United States

Convention on the Rights of the Child: Would Ratification Impact American Kids?

The United States is now the only U.N. member that has not ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child. While this may be relevant on the world stage, it is far from clear that ratification would have any significant impact on the rights of U.S. children.


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No Comments | Posted by Ellenmai Korkoya on Tue. November 3, 2015 9:40 AM
Categories: Children's rights, International Human Rights, Somalia, United Nations, United States
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