Blog Archive: 2013

Weekly News Roundup - 12/15 - 12/21

In this Friday/All-NC version of the Poverty News Roundup, read about yet another study linking childhood poverty to brain development, an in-depth look at Asheville's homeless and hungry population, and a city in NC that was ranked the place with the 5th-fastest-growing poverty rate in the country. And a bit of good news added, too.


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No Comments | Posted by Joseph Arthur Polich on Fri. December 20, 2013 9:52 AM
Categories: News

Thursday Poverty News Roundup

Catch up on select articles, stats, and infographics related to poverty in our state and country in our Weekly Poverty News Roundup for 12/8 - 12/14!


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Posted by Joseph Arthur Polich on Thu. December 12, 2013 1:45 PM
Categories: News

Map of Foreclosures: 2011 Foreclosures in Durham Court File Review

The center's Foreclosure Project has collected data on about 200 court files for residential foreclosure proceedings started in Durham County in 2011. This map shows the number of foreclosures from our sample by zip code. Click on different tracts within the map to get more information about race, poverty, median household income and homeownership by zip code.

Look out for more information about the court file review and other work of the Foreclosure Project soon.


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No Comments | Posted by Heather A. Hunt on Wed. September 25, 2013 8:28 AM
Categories: News

Our First Look at the 2012 American Community Survey data for North Carolina

Today the U.S. Census released the results of the 2012 American Community Survey data, allowing us to examine state-wide trends through the year 2012. Research Fellow Joe Polich tells us what stands out to him in this blog post.


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No Comments | Posted by Joseph Arthur Polich on Thu. September 19, 2013 10:19 PM
Categories: News

2013 Legislative Report: Commonsense Consumption Act Presents Considerable Health Threat to Vulnerable Consumers

Summer research assistant Howard Lintz writes about the Commonsense Consumption Act and its impact on low-income individuals who often face limited access to food and other barriers to nutritious meal choices.

The Commonsense Consumption Act (introduced as House Bill 683) protects businesses at the cost of public health, and it may prove especially harmful to particularly vulnerable North Carolinians. It was signed into law on July 18.

The law bars civil actions based on claims that long-term consumption of food has caused weight gain, obesity, associated health conditions, or other “generally known condition(s)”; distributors, manufacturers, and marketers, among others, would have no liability in such instances.

This portion of the bill is virtually identical to the model proposed by conservative think-tank the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC). The North Carolina law, however, would also bar city and county ordinances from prohibiting the sale of soft drinks above a particular size.


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No Comments | Posted by Howard M. Lintz (Howie) on Sat. August 31, 2013 1:43 PM
Categories: 2013 Legislative Report, Student Research, Through Our Eyes

2013 Legislative Report: At Whose Expense Will "Restoring Faith" in Our Election System Come? Part 2

In April, members of the North Carolina General Assembly introduced the VIVA bill as an effort to establish a voter ID law in our state, as I wrote about previously. By the time the bill returned to the state House in the final week of July, both its name and content were expanded and the debate surrounding it was more fervent than ever.

The VIVA/Election Reform bill’s impact on early voting in North Carolina has been at the center of the argument. Early, in-person voting is currently permitted in 32 states[1] and has been used in North Carolina since the 2000 General Election. Regardless of political affiliation, North Carolinian voters “like early voting because it works in their schedule,” according to former State Board of Elections director Gary Bartlett.[2] Statistics support Mr. Bartlett’s claim. Nearly 2.4 million early, in-person votes were cast by North Carolinians in the 2008 General Election,[3] accounting for roughly 55% of votes in the state.[4] Early, in-person votes rose to over 2.5 million in the 2012 General Election.[5]


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No Comments | Posted by Brent J. Ducharme on Thu. August 29, 2013 1:47 PM
Categories: 2013 Legislative Report, Student Research, Through Our Eyes

2013 Legislative Report: North Carolina's Rejection of Medicaid Expansion

North Carolina officially rejected Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Health Care Act on March 6, 2013, as Governor Pat McCrory signed Senate Bill 4.[1] The provision of the Affordable Care Act was intended to expand Medicaid eligibility to adults with incomes below 133 percent of the federal poverty line. [2] Qualifying persons would have ultimately included all adults below 138 percent of the federal poverty line since 5 percent of income is disregarded when determining eligibility. The Affordable Care Act provides federal funding for the expansion for the first three years, and then at least 90 percent for each of the following years.[3]

Medicaid now covers 1,589,807 low income parents, pregnant women, children, seniors and individuals with disabilities.[4] Parents must not only have dependent children under the age of 21, but they must also have very low incomes to be eligible. For example, the income for a family of four may not exceed $594/month for the parents to be eligible.[5] Additionally, very poor adults between the age of 18 and 64 with no children or disability do not qualify for Medicaid despite how low their income is. Under the expansion, adults with incomes less than $14,856 would be eligible for Medicaid, regardless of their familial status.[6] Studies have estimated the expansion would have provided an additional 500,000 uninsured adults with eligibility in North Carolina[7]. If the state had adopted the program expansion, it has been estimated North Carolina would have saved between 1 and 2 billion over a five year period.[8] Still, North Carolina decided to join more than twenty states, including its neighboring states – South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia – in rejecting the expansion of Medicaid program.


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No Comments | Posted by Brittany C. Croom on Wed. August 28, 2013 1:45 PM
Categories: 2013 Legislative Report, Student Research, Through Our Eyes

Free Medical Clinics in North Carolina: Providing a Great Service to the Underserved in Our Communities, Yet Also Facing Great Uncertainty

Imagine you wake up one morning with an agonizing pain in your stomach. You have already been to the emergency room for this problem once before and find yourself continually harassed by collection agencies for soaring medical bills built up from that one unavoidable visit. You don’t want to go back to the hospital and bury yourself even further into debt, but you don’t have health insurance or even enough cash in your bank account to go to a general physician or an urgent care facility. The pain is overwhelming and you want nothing more to see a doctor who could easily treat your problem, but the thought of digging yourself even deeper into a financial hole seems equally painful. So, where do you go? Who do you turn to?


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No Comments | Posted by William B. Dickey on Mon. August 19, 2013 5:28 PM
Categories: Student Research, Through Our Eyes

Impact of College Students on Poverty Rates

Researchers, public administrators, and communities at large have long discussed the impact of college students on poverty rates in cities and towns across the country. Particularly in communities with large student populations, poverty numbers do not reflect that most college students are not actually living in poverty (supported by family or student loans) even if their lack of income or low/part-time wages would suggest poverty status.


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No Comments | Posted by Mary Lynn Irvine on Fri. August 2, 2013 4:20 PM
Categories: News

Meet the Interns: Whitley Carpenter

Whitley Carpenter

Please welcome Whitley Carpenter! Whitley has been working hard over the past few weeks to compile information about the state's free civil legal services system, and the impact of having (or not having) a lawyer to assist with one's legal needs. Thank you, Whitley, for joining us, and we look forward to getting to know you better!

Mary


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No Comments | Posted by Mary Lynn Irvine on Mon. July 29, 2013 3:31 PM
Categories: Meet the Interns
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